Quackenbush Farm Claimed

 

Quackenbush Farm is an idyllic little family farm in the Clackamas river valley just East of Portland, Oregon. We grow nutrient dense veggies and lush pastures among stands of oak, cedar, and maple. Land stewardship and ecological diversity are among our highest priorities, and we make sure that our farming practices are positively impacting the environment. Some of our specialties include heirloom tomatoes, potatoes, greens, lamb, and chicken. We currently raise Katahdin lamb and Imperial meat chickens.

Where to Find Our Products

We currently sell our products to the public at several farmers markets and our farm stand. You can find us at the Milwaukie Farmers Market on Sundays from May through October, and the Vancouver Farmers Market on Saturdays and Sundays from May through December. Our farm stand, located at the entrance of the farm, is open year round 9am to 6pm and is self serve.

Production Practices

We rotationally graze our 12 acres of pasture and oak savanna with a small flock of Katahdin lambs each year. Our lambs are fed only what grows on the pasture, nothing else. We also raise a limited number of Imperial meat chickens, a slower growing breed with richer flavor and larger legs and thighs than the standard Cornish cross. These are moved each day on our pasture and given a non-GMO feed from our local Union Mills, one of the last old-fashioned feed mills in the valley.

We manage our pastures and our land with a long term vision of sustainability. Our lambs are rotated together into new forage every 6 days, ensuring the health of both the animals and the pasture. We monitor the nutrients in our soil and our grass through regular testing and adjust the mineral balances for a more nutritious crop.

Environmental Conservation

We view the intersection of agriculture and ecological restoration as a critical link in the good stewardship of land. We are in the process of restoring our pastures to something more closely resembling native Willamette Valley prairie, with the goal of adding at least 30 different species of grasses and wildflowers. Our farm is home to some rare patches of Oregon white oak savanna, including several rare and threatened birds that depend on them. We use our livestock to help manage these areas, and have excluded them from other, more sensitive areas of the farm. We also partner with the NRCS and the Clackamas SWCD to implement conservation practices, such as our pollinator and wildlife hedgerows.